Addiction

add.ic.tion
|�?�?dik sh �?n|
n.noun

The American Society of Addiction Medicine defines addiction as, "being characterized by inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response."

Addiction is a dangerous behavior that can affect a person in a numerous amount of ways. Addicts may be addicted to a harmful substance, such as methamphetamine, cocaine or alcohol. Additionally, a person may suffer from non-substance addictions such as, self-harm, eating disorder or gambling habit. Although very different from one another, substance and non-substance addictions are both dangerous and potentially life threatening. Moreover, a person who suffers from an addiction requires specialized treatment in order to achieve adequate rehabilitation.

There are many different types of facilities, treatments, and therapeutic methods used in treating an addicted individual. One-on-one therapies, group sessions, and 24-hour treatment care are the most effective options in terms of treating an addicted person. The specific treatment that best suits an individual, exclusively depends on their particular addictions and the severity of their habits.